Archive - February 2014

1
iCloudy With A Chance Of Sweet Potato Quinoa Chili
2
(Eye) Glasses Half Full
3
This Post Is Nothing But Negativity. Sorry In Advance.
4
Levity During Loss—thank you for the flours
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Goodbyes Are Never Easy
6
Laugh When It’s Easy, Laugh Harder When It’s Not
7
Precocious Puberty?!

iCloudy With A Chance Of Sweet Potato Quinoa Chili

   I HATE GROCERY SHOPPING. It’s exhausting, boring, requires pants and possibly brushed hair, and it’s mind numbingly repetitive — buy food, make food, family eats food, repeat… Something I’ve found to help get me in and out of the grocery store quickly, thus getting this chore done as fast as possible is a clear and precise shopping list.  I’ve tried them all—basic pen and paper lists, cutesy notepads and all kinds of grocery apps. Some of have been good-ish, but I’ve recently started using something new that is easy and effective. The video below is a ridiculous demo of me explaining (in a disgusting head cold, post nasal drip voice…sorry) how to use the FREE iCal Reminder folder on your iPhone to make an organized and easily updatable and revisable grocery list. Why is this brilliant? You can sync your list via iCLOUD to the other iDevices in your home so everyone can view and make changes to the current version of the family grocery list. Soooo, if your husband drinks the last of the coffee he can quickly update the list on his phone. This is much more pleasant (and less violent) than finding out there’s no coffee[…]

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(Eye) Glasses Half Full

  One of the best and somewhat unexpected benefits of being a parent is the comic relief. Parenting is hilarious.  Kids have an exceptional sense of comedic timing that I think we lose as we get older. Maybe the funny moments come easier to them because they are free of inhibitions or they aren’t weighed down by the worries that are pinned to adulthood. It’s difficult to feel blue when your youngest child tugs at the hem of your coat and you turn around to see this…   Yes little girl, you do amuse me. To my silly son who took this “somewhat” altered photo of me and called it Fat Pinocchio. I howled. Seems I’ve given birth to two Court Jesters.  

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This Post Is Nothing But Negativity. Sorry In Advance.

 Warning: There is an X-rated-ish photo at the end of this post.   I try not to whine too much online and most of the stories I share here on this blog have {hopefully} a silver lining kind of message. But man, sometimes a gal just has to vent. It probably doesn’t help that I’ve had a rough week culminating in an awful head cold and have slept with wads of Kleenex shoved up both nostrils for the past two nights. So if I may, I’m going to vent freely. Feel free to read or not. Here are ten things that got stuck in my craw today. If not dealt with promptly, this will result in a festering craw blister. Ouch. 1.The line up at the Tim Horton’s drive-thru this morning was at least twenty cars long backed up into the street. Get out of your car you bunch of laziess and go inside to get your damn coffee. The only one who should be idling, is Billy.  2. Traffic circles… please learn how to use them. The yield sign is not a suggestion. If I’m entering the circle first, I have the right of way. This means you not[…]

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Levity During Loss—thank you for the flours

My brother made the drive from Michigan to Ontario to be with us for my mother-in-law’s memorial service. Before he left he called to see what I’d like him to bring. I asked for my favourite flour—whole wheat but made from white wheat kernels—perfect for bread and pancakes, but I can’t seem to find it here in Canada.   When he arrived and offered his condolences, I hugged him as he passed me the two bags of King Arthur. “Thanks for the flours.” I said through tears. And then we laughed. The ridiculousness of this statement brought some much needed levity to an otherwise somber situation.   My brother-in-law flew home from overseas last week and he’s been making us laugh since he got home. His stories about his mom and all the good times has brought both laughter and tears — honouring her this way is helping us begin to heal. My son is having a difficult time accepting that his “Grandie” is really gone. But talking about her and remembering the special moments is helping him cope. He has vowed to keep her memory alive for his younger cousins and little sister. My daughter knows her Grandie is[…]

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Laugh When It’s Easy, Laugh Harder When It’s Not

Before Facebook and Twitter, we weren’t always privy to the intimate details of other people’s lives the way we are now. Today we Instashare everything — and not just the pretty moments. I find this to be both horrid and helpful. There’s no need to elaborate on the negative side of social media — the drama, the bullying (I’m talkin’ about grown-ups here) and of course the “I can never un-see that but wish I could” TMI bits. So let’s focus on the helpful. Social Media, blogging in particular, has given me an opportunity to share the story of my family — from our daughter’s diagnosis of a rare chromosomal abnormality, to now and into the future. I’ve been able to connect with other families with similar experiences, as well as with people with typical children who simply want to understand or offer support. I’m grateful for both. It isn’t easy raising a child with special needs; especially if you’re a worrier and a planner. But the one thing that helps me cope, is him —my partner in this thing called Family Life. He makes me laugh every day. Even on the really shitty days. Know how they say, “Laughter is the[…]

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Precocious Puberty?!

  My friend wrote this thoughtful post about our responsibility as mature adults to talk to our kids about…ahem, you know, the birds and the bees. (Hello 1957.) She’s absolutely right. Whether our children are educated in these matters at school or home, we need to provide them with the facts necessary for them to make safe and healthy choices—for their bodies and for their tender hearts. I remember the “talk” when I was growing up. Back then these awkward talks were isolated moments in time. Instead of slowly doling out the details as our children mature, giving them age appropriate info as needed, our parents sat us down at the age of eleven-ish and dumped the facts of life into our laps. My mum did a great job. She sat me down in our kitchen and told me what to expect as I developed. I didn’t make eye contact as she explained about a garden and some kind of complicated seed planting situation. Despite the Better Homes and (lady) Gardens metaphor, I understood. I also felt reasonably comfortable going to my mum during my teen years with questions. Luckily, I didn’t have many that couldn’t be answered by my[…]

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